Wild Rice Pancakes

I don’t know about you, but I loooove wild rice. Its nutty flavor and chewy texture is great. Wild rice is also high in protein and fiber and low in fat, making it a healthy option. AND the most commonly harvested variety of wild rice grows right here in Minnesota.

Wild Rice

I used some good ol’ Minnesota wild rice to make pancakes. This recipe calls for green onions;  bright, tart flavor complements the nuttiness of the wild rice well. These pancakes are perfect for breakfast with a little bit of fruit spread or anytime you want something light and healthy. Make sure that you have enough time to cook the wild rice (around 55 minutes) if you haven’t made it ahead of time.

 Wild Rice Pancakes

WR Pancakes

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup white whole wheat flour
  • 1 Tbsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1/8 tsp ground cayenne pepper
  • 1 1/4 cups non-dairy milk
  • 1/4 cup melted Earth Balance
  • 2 large eggs, separated
  • 1 cup cooked wild rice
  • 3 green onions, chopped

Instructions

  1. In a medium bowl combine flour, baking powder, salt, and cayenne pepper.
  2. Add milk and Earth Balance, whisking until blended. Stir in the egg yolks.
  3. In a separate bowl, beat the egg whites at medium speed until stiff peaks form.
  4. Fold rice, green onions, and egg whites into the flour mixture.
  5. Pour about 1/4 batter for each pancake onto a hot griddle (I used an electric griddle, set at about 350 degrees)
  6. Cook pancakes until the batter gets bubbly and they’re lightly browned; flip and cook a few more minutes.

These come out thin enough that you could cover them with butter, fruit spread or whatever you like and roll them up, crepe style. Yum.

Source: Adapted from  MyRecipes

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Onigiri

I’m prone to massive Japanese food cravings at odd hours, and had one for onigiri recently. Onigiri are rice balls,

made from white rice formed into triangular or oval shapes and often wrapped in nori (seaweed). Traditionally, an onigiri is filled with pickled ume (umeboshi), salted salmon, katsuobushi, kombu, tarako, or any other salty or sour ingredient as a natural preservative. Because of the popularity of onigiri in Japan, most convenience stores stock their onigiri with various fillings and flavors.

By typester from Kamakura, Kanagawa (Flickr) [CC-BY-SA-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

When I was in Japan I remember seeing  displays of onigiri, similar to the one above,  in convenience stores. I ate onigiri pretty often as it was cheap and tasty, and our food budget was quite small.

Onigiri

IMGP2405

Ingredients

Sushi rice (may be labeled sushi rice or Calrose rice)
Water (to cook rice)
1 cup water
1/4 tsp salt
Nori
Sesame seeds and/or furikake
Filling options: tuna, salmon, wasabi paste, pickled plums, bonito flakes, kombu (sea kelp), and/or whatever else you think sounds good.

Instructions

  1. Follow the directions on the bag of rice regarding washing and cooking rice. Allow the rice to cool enough so that you can handle it.
  2. Combine cup of water and salt – this will help keep the rice from sticking to your hands.
  3. Dampen your hands in salted water and divide the rice into however many onigiri you’d like to make.
  4. If you want to fill the onigiri, divide each portion into two and create a dimple in the rice. Put your filling of choice in the dimple, and cover with the remaining rice. Mold into whatever shape you’d like – triangles are common.
  5. Wrap the onigiri with nori right before serving so it doesn’t get soggy (believe me – it’s not pretty). You can sprinkle with seasonings now or just before serving.
  6. If making to serve later, wrap tightly in plastic wrap to keep them together, and store in refrigerator.

Check out this great onigiri-making tutorial, complete with pictures.

 

I didn’t have much luck with these – they kind of fell apart on me. But they tasted delicious, and it’s definitely something I will try again in the future.

Source: Inspired by SeriousEats and Allrecipes

 

Pickled Ginger and California Roll Bowl

I’ve found that it’s hard to be very imaginative when using imitation crab meat, so I went looking for some recipes and found one for a California Roll Bowl. It called for pickled ginger, and I being a pickling virgin and having so much fresh stuff sitting on the counter,  decided to make my own.

Pickled Ginger

Pickled Ginger

Ingredients
  • 8 ounces of fresh ginger root, peeled
  • 1 1/2 tsp sea salt,
  • 1 cup rice vinegar
  • 1/3 cup white sugar

Instructions

  1. You can cut the ginger into chunks and wait until after they’re pickled  to slice them, but I prefer cutting them fairly thin before pickling them, so I used a mandoline (and ended up cutting my finger : ( ). Sprinkle with sea salt, stir to coat and let stand for about 30 minutes. Transfer the ginger to a clean jar(s).
  2. In a saucepan, stir together the rice vinegar and sugar until the sugar has dissolved. Bring to a boil, then carefully pour the boiling liquid over the ginger root pieces in the jar(s), splitting up equally if using more than one jar.
  3. Allow the mixture to cool, then put the lid on the jar and store in the refrigerator for at least one week.

Source: Adapted from AllRecipes.com

 California Roll Bowl

Ingredients

  • 1 cup brown rice
  • 1/2 cup imitation crab meat, chopped
  • 2/3 cup cucumber, peeled, sliced, and cut into approximately matchstick-size pieces
  • 1/4 cup grated carrot
  • 1/2 a ripe avocado, diced
  • About 1 tsp pickled ginger, chopped
  • 3 tsp rice wine vinegar
  • 1 tsp soy sauce
  • a bit of wasabi paste (optional)
  • Garnishes: sesame seeds, nori and/or furikake seasoning

Instructions

  1. Combine all ingredients in bowl, adding avocado last so it does not turn to mush when mixed. Sprinkle garnishes on top and serve.

Source: Adapted from SparkRecipes